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English language and literature

English literature - A level

Year 12

Term Topics taught and learning outcomes
Term 1.1
  • Understand the typical features and conventions of tragic plays and novels and essential terminology needed throughout the A-level English Literature course.
  • Understand what a 'tragic hero' is and explore how they are flawed in some way, and how they suffer and/or cause suffering to others in 'The Great Gatsby' by F. Scott Fitzgerald and 'Richard II' by William Shakespeare.
  • Develop an understanding of the structural pattern of the texts as they move through complication to catastrophe, from order to disorder, through climax to resolution, from the prosperity and happiness of the hero to the tragic end.

ASSESSMENT

Examination style questions on the two set texts.

HOMEWORK

Students will complete contextual research tasks on 'The Great Gatsby' and 'Richard II' and their writers.

Term 1.2
  • Examine the way that language is used to heighten the tragedy in the set texts.
  • Explore the journey towards the death of the protagonists, their flaws, pride and folly, their blindness and insight, their discovery and learning, their being a mix of good and evil.
  • Identify connections and comparisons between the two set texts.

ASSESSMENT

Winter progress exam in December.

HOMEWORK

Read and analyse 'Atonement' by Ian McEwan and complete contextual research on William Shakespeare over the Christmas holidays.

Term 2.1
  • Understand narrative structure theories and apply to 'Othello' by William Shakespeare and 'Atonement' by Ian McEwan.
  • Explore the settings in which the tragedy occurs in the set texts; both places and times.
  • Examine the presence of fate and how the hero's end is inevitable in the set texts studied.

ASSESSMENT

Examination style questions on the two set texts.

HOMEWORK

Contextual presentations on 'Oliver Twist' and 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' and their writers.

Term 2.2
  • Explore the transgressions against established order and the specific breaking of either national, social, religious or moral laws.
  • Explore the use of settings that are created as backdrops for criminal action and for the pursuit of the perpetrators of crime in the set texts.
  • Examine the structural patterning of the set texts as they move through a series of crises to some sense of order.

ASSESSMENT

Spring progress exam

HOMEWORK

Reread 'The Great Gatsby and 'Richard II' over the Easter holidays.

Term 3.1
  • Explore how crime stories affect audiences and readers, creating suspense, repugnance, excitement and relief.
  • Read and analyse the language, form and structure presented in Charles Dickens' novel 'Oliver Twist' and Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'.
  • Explore a range of critical responses to the set texts and examine how crime stories affect audiences and readers, creating suspense, repugnance, excitement and relief.

ASSESSMENT

Examination style questions on the two set texts.

HOMEWORK

Contextual presentations on 'Oliver Twist' and 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' and their writers.

Term 3.2
  • Explore a range of unseen poetry, prose and drama across time.
  • Develop an understanding of formal essay writing and research skills.
  • Research literary themes and concepts in independently chosen texts and apply literary critical theories to them (including Marxism and feminism) in preparation for writing A-level coursework assignment of 2500-3000 words.

ASSESSMENT

Examination style questions.

HOMEWORK

Reread 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 'Atonement' by Ian McEwan and 'Oliver Twist' by Charles Dickens and produce appropriate revision materials for future reference.

Research topic and texts thoroughly for 'Theory and independence' coursework (worth 20% of the total A-level grade).

Year 13

Term Topics taught and learning outcomes
Term 1.1
  • Read and analyse 'Brave New World' by Aldous Huxley and a selection of Romantic poetry by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Blake and William Wordsworth.
  • Compare and contrast how themes, concepts and ideas are presented in the set texts.
  • Interpret the language and concepts presented by the writers to convey ideas, feelings and attitudes.

ASSESSMENT

Students will complete their A2 English Literature coursework on utopian and dystopian texts at the end of this term. The coursework assignment must be 2500-3000 words and is worth 40% of the A2 grade, and 20% of the overall A-level grade.

HOMEWORK

Students will be working on this coursework assignment independently throughout this term and a full first draft is due in straight after the October half term.

Term 1.2
  • Understand the four assessment objectives and how to satisfy them and develop an understanding of A-level essay writing skills.
  • Explore the contexts of the texts studied and the interpretations of others.
  • Apply literary theory and criticism to the set texts.

ASSESSMENT

Students will complete their A2 English Literature coursework on utopian and dystopian texts at the end of this term. The coursework assignment must be 2500-3000 words and is worth 40% of the A2 grade, and 20% of the overall A-level grade.

Students will also sit a winter progress exam.

HOMEWORK

Students will be working on this coursework assignment independently throughout this term and a full final draft is due in before the Christmas holidays.

Students must also read 'The Kite Runner' by Khaled Hosseini and 'Spies' by Michael Frayn and complete contextual research over the Christmas holidays.

Term 2.1
  • Read and analyse 'The Kite Runner' by Khaled Hosseini and 'Spies' by Michael Frayn.
  • Explore the theme of war (contexts, genres and attitudes) in 'The Kite Runner', 'Spies' and a selection of poetry from the 'Here to Eternity' anthology.
  • Develop an understanding of the significance of the ways in which writers use and adapt language, form and structure in the texts studied.

ASSESSMENT

Past exam paper questions.

HOMEWORK

Students will independently analyse several poems from the 'War' section of the 'Here to Eternity' anthology.

Term 2.2
  • Develop an understanding of the significance of the interpretation of texts by different readers, including over time.
  • Explore relationships between texts and develop an understanding of the significance of culture and contextual influences upon readers and writers.
  • Develop and effectively apply knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation to the set texts.

ASSESSMENT

Past exam paper questions.

HOMEWORK

Students will reread 'The Kite Runner' by Khaled Hosseini and 'Spies' by Michael Frayn and will also analyse more poems from the 'War' section of the 'Here to Eternity' anthology.

Term 3.1
  • Understand how to communicate knowledge, understanding and judgement of texts fluently, accurately and effectively.
  • Develop an understanding of how to use literary critical concepts and terminology with accuracy.
  • Explore and examine a range of unseen poetry and prose in preparation for the examination.

ASSESSMENT

Examination (2 hours 45 minutes).

HOMEWORK

Revision of plot, characterisation, themes, concepts and ideas presented in 'The Kite Runner', 'Spies' and war poetry.

Examination style essays/past papers (all available on Frog).

Term 3.2

No course content for Term 3.2. because students will have finished the course.

ASSESSMENT

Students will have completed the course by term 3.2

HOMEWORK

Students will have completed the course by term 3.2